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Friday, 31 August 2007

The Fife Scotland Coast


The Fife Coast, from the Forth Bridges to Leuchars by the Castles Coast and the East Neuk. The Fife Coast has long been a popular area for walkers. Hamish Brown, writer, traveller and climber, has compiled a fascinating book of walks which take the reader from the Forth Bridge along the Castles Coast, by Aberdour, Ravenscraig, Wemyss and many more, and then into the East Neuk. The book is divided into sections and can be used as a town guide or, better, to allow the reader to walk either the complete route or to sample the delights of a particular spot. It is packed with information and pictures that illustrate an area full of historical charm and natural beauty. Dalmeny, South Queensferry, Inchcolm, Over the Bridge, North Queensferry. After travelling to Dalmeny and Queensferry the day is spent in local explorations, a sail to Inchcolm, the Iona of the East, and then walking on across the vast suspension bridge to the Fife shore. A relaxing day to pick up the mood of quiet, historical villages and just being on the fresh Firth of Forth coast. The Fife Coast: From the Forth Bridges to Leuchars by the Castles Coast and the East Neuk.

Barbara Dickson born in Fife Scotland


Barbara Dickson OBE, was born in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, on 27 September 1947. She is Scottish singer, best known for her stage and concert performances, and some hit singles. A widely respected and richly experienced entertainer, Barbara Dickson marks 40 years as a professional musician with the release of Nothing's Gonna Change My World. Produced by Chris Hughes, widely known for his work with Tears For Fears, Paul McCartney, Robert Plant and countless others, the album includes both well-known and less-celebrated material from the Beatles catalogue, as well as a guest appearance by Midge Ure on I'll Be Back. Nothing's Gonna Change My World: The Songs of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison.

Thursday, 30 August 2007

Jimmy Shand born in Fife Scotland


Jimmy Shand was born in East Wemyss in Fife, son of a farm ploughman turned miner. One of nine children, they soon moved to the burgh of Auchtermuchty. The Jimmy Shand Story. The King of Scottish Dance Music. A biography of the musician, Jimmy Shand. This book ranges from his boyhood in East Wemyss, Scotland, through the early years as an amateur accordian player, right up to the present day. It includes a listing of Shand's recordings on vinyl, cassette and CD, and also his sheet music compositions. The Jimmy Shand Story: The King of Scottish Dance Music.

Wednesday, 29 August 2007

Tour Kinghorn Scotland


Tour Kinghorn, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

James Wilson born in Fife Scotland


James Wilson, one of seven children, was born to a Presbyterian farming family at Carskerdo, in the Parish of Ceres, Fife, Scotland, and educated at the University of St. Andrews, the University of Edinburgh, and the University of Glasgow. He was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, twice elected to the Continental Congress, a major force in the drafting of the nation's Constitution, a leading legal theoretician and one of the six original justices appointed by George Washington to the United States Supreme Court in 1789.

James Wilson, one of only six men to sign both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, was a central figure in early American politics. This text provides a comprehensive analysis of his political and legal philosophy. The Political and Legal Philosophy of James Wilson, 1742-98.

Ian Rankin born in Fife Scotland


Ian Rankin OBE, DL, was born April 28, 1960, in Cardenden, Fife, Scotland, and is one of the best-selling crime writers in the United Kingdom. His best known books are the Inspector Rebus novels. In Rebus's Scotland, Ian Rankin uncovers the Scotland that the tourist never sees, highlighting the places that inspired the settings for the Inspector Rebus novels. Rankin also reveals the story of Rebus and how he came into being, who he is, and what his, and Rankin's, Scotland is like. With over 100 evocative photographs, specially commissioned to reflect the text, this book is the perfect gift for anyone interested in Scotland or in the novels of Ian Rankin. Rebus's Scotland: A Personal Journey.

Pittenweem Fife Scotland


Pittenweem is the number one port in the East Neuk of Fife, Scotland, and visitors will see the harbour at its liveliest when the fish market is open. The name Pittenweem means " place of the cave " and dates back to the very early days when a cave in old Cove Wynd was used as a place of worship by the missionary St. Fillan during the 7th century.

Jim Baxter born in Fife Scotland


Jim Baxter, (September 29, 1939 – April 14, 2001), was born in Hill of Beath, Fife, Scotland, He started his career at Raith Rovers F.C. before moving to boyhood heroes Rangers F.C. for a Scottish record transfer fee £17,500 aged 20 in 1960. The rise and all too quick downfall of possibly Scotland’s best ever player. Slim Jim Baxter: The Definitive Biography.

Ian Anderson born in Fife Scotland


Ian Scott Anderson was born on August 10, 1947, in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. Also known as The Voice of Jethro Tull, Ian is a Scottish singer, songwriter, guitarist and flautist best known for his work as the head of British rock band Jethro Tull.

Originally formed by singer-songwriter Ian Anderson in psychedelic 1968, the band Hethro Tull has been recording its own kind of rock and roll and touring the globe for more than three decades. This is a history of the band through the present, written by a personal acquaintance of several of its members. The book includes a chronology of all of the band's recordings and information on all accompanying tours, with the author's critiques as well as the band's own reminiscences and opinions of each album. Also included are previously unpublished interviews with founder Ian Anderson long-time band member David Pegg, Mick Abrahams, Jeffrey Hammond, and Doane Perry, and other band members. "Jethro Tull": A History of the Band 1968-2001.

Robert Adam born in Fife Scotland


Adam was born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland, the second son of William Adam (1689–1748), a stonemason and architect who was Scotland's foremost designer of country houses at the time. His younger brother and business partner James Adam was also an architect of some note, as was his older brother John Adam, although both were overshadowed by Robert.

He is considered by many to be the greatest architect of the late 18th century, and a leader of the neo-classical revival in England and Scotland from around 1760 until his death. Sir William Chambers was the leading British official architect of the era, but Adam received many important commissions from private clients and had a more lasting stylistic influence, termed the Adam style.

The name of Robert Adam is today equated, as it was by his contemporaries, with taste, style and elegance. Since his death, the term 'Adamesque' has been used to describe not only ceilings, doorways and fireplaces but objects as various as the City Hall in Charleston and a chamber-pot. A university drop-out, Adam still made his own scholarly contribution to the understanding of classical architecture and was a talented painter as well. As visionary in the decoration of interiors as he was ingenious in the design of exteriors, Adam was more often responsible for the renovation, alteration or completion of existing buildings than for the creation of entirely new ones. Best known perhaps for his work on great private palaces such as Syon and Kenwood, Osterley and Kedleston, Saltram and Culzean, Adam was also responsible for churches and tombs, monuments and market-halls and for such public commissions as the Admiralty Screen in Whitehall and Britain's first purpose-built public archive, The Register House in Edinburgh. Robert Adam: An Illustrated Life of Robert Adam, 1728-92 (Lifelines).

The Works in Architecture of Robert and James Adam. The Brothers Adam were almost single-handedly responsible for infusing Georgian Architecture with the sensibilities and elements of classical Helenic and Latinate design. This illustrated volume details the origins and genesis of the famous Adam Style, and features numerous examples of the Adams' elegant and intricate design. The Works in Architecture of Robert and James Adam (Dover Books on Architecture) (Dover Books on Architecture).

The Genius of Robert Adam, his Interiors. The Genius of Robert Adam: His Interiors (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies).

Fife Coastal Path


The Fife Coastal Path, Scotland, includes a section that runs along the rocky shoreline from Anstruther to Crail.

A Fife Childhood


Hellfire and Herring, A Fife, Scotland, Childhood. The scent of God, the air was impregnated with him and his mint-sweet and moth-ball evangelists. Just as it was with herring, as you might expect in a fossilised fishing-village on Scotland’s repressed east coast where fishing was an act of faith and not yet a computer-science industry designed to suck the last drops of life out of the sea.

A vivid and moving account of the author’s upbringing in the 1940s and 1950s in the little fishing village of St Monans. Rush returns decades later to rediscover his childhood, and offers a frank account of how it was for him.

This evocation of a way of life now vanished demonstrates the power of the word to bring the past timelessly to life. Rush writes of family, village characters, church and school; of folklore and fishing, the eternal power of the sea and the cycles of the seasons. With a poet’s eye he navigates the worlds of the imagination and the unknown, the archetypal problems of fathers and sons and mother love, and the inescapability of childhood influences far on into adult life. Hellfire and Herring.

The Witches of Fife Scotland

The Witches of Fife. Witch-hunting in a Scottish Shire, 1560-1710. Along the coast of Fife, in villages like Culross and Pittenweem, historical markers and pamphlets now include the fact that some women were executed as witches within these burghs. Still the reality of what happened the night that Janet Cornfoot was lynched in the harbour is hard to grasp as one sits in the harbour of Pittenweem watching the fishing boats unload their catch and the pleasure boats rising with the tide. How could people do this to an old woman? Why was no-one ever brought to justice? And why would anyone defend such a lynching? The task of the historian is to try to make events in the past come alive and seem less strange. This is particularly true in the case of the historian dealing with the witch-hunt. The details are fascinating. Some of the anecdotes are strange. The modern reader finds it hard to imagine illness being blamed on the malevolence of a beggar woman denied charity. It is difficult to understand the economic failure of a sea voyage being attributed to the village hag, not bad weather. Witch-hunting was related to ideas, values, attitudes and political events. It was a complicated process, involving religious and civil authorities, village tensions and the fears of the elite. The witch-hunt in Scotland also took place at a time when one of the main agendas was the creation of a righteous or godly society. As a result, religious authorities had control over aspects of the lives of the people which seem every bit as strange to us today as might any beliefs about magic or witchcraft. That the witch-hunt in Scotland, and specifically in Fife, should have happened at this time was not accidental. This book tells the story of what occurred over a period of a century and a half, and offers some explanation as to why it occurred. The Witches of Fife: Witch-hunting in a Scottish Shire, 1560-1710.

Burntisland Railway Port of Fife Scotland


Burntisland, Fife's Railway Port. The crossing of the Firth of Forth makes Burntisland an interesting and important railway centre. Ferries had been established for some years before the introduction the world's first roll-on roll-off train ferry in 1850. The construction of another remarkable piece of engineering, the Forth Bridge, eventually lead to a loss of importance of the ferry crossing. The NBR exported huge quantities of coal from the Fife coalfield through the Burntisland Docks which were gradually improved and expanded through the years. This book is presented in A5 format. It contains 192 pages, 140 illustrations with a colour laminated card cover and square-backed spine. Burntisland: Fife's Railway Port (Locomotion papers).

William Tennant born in Fife Scotland


William Tennant ( 1784-1815 ) Scottish poet and scholar, born in the fishing village of Anstruther, Fife, Scotland. The Comic Poems (Association for Scottish Literary Studies, Vol 19).

Famous people from Fife, Scotland.

Andrew Carnegie born in Fife Scotland


Andrew Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and the Gospel of Wealth (Signet Classics).

Famous people born in Fife, Scotland.

Alexander Selkirk born in Fife Scotland


Alexander Selkirk, (1676-1721), Scottish sailor, and the Real Robinson Crusoe, was born in Largo, Fife, Scotland. Marooned: The Strange But True Adventures of Alexander Selkirk, the Real Robinson Crusoe.

Famous people from Fife.

Thomas Chalmers born in Fife Scotland


Thomas Chalmers ( 1780-1853 ) Scottish theologian and preacher, was born in Anstruther, Fife, Scotland. Thomas Chalmers and the Godly Commonwealth in Scotland.

Famous people born in Fife.

Adam Smith Born in Fife Scotland


Adam Smith was born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. The Authentic Adam Smith. The Authentic Adam Smith: His Life and Ideas (Enterprise (W.W. Norton)).

Famous People born in Fife.

Anstruther Fife History


Anstruther History, Fife, Scotland. Anstruther is one of the most picturesque villages on the north coast of the Forth, packed with architectural delights and filled with historical resonance. Trade with the Low Countries began as early as the late fourteenth century; during the eighteenth century it was home to a chapter of the dubious gentleman's club The Beggar's Benison and during the nineteenth and early part of the twentieth it enjoyed its heyday as one of the main centres of the Scottish herring industry. Today it houses the world-renowned Scottish Fisheries Museum. Anstruther was in fact, until recently, two distinct communities. The small settlements of Anstruther Easter and Wester grew up on either side of a burn. In spite of their nearness they grew in different ways. Both were granted charters in the 1580s and became self-governing communities, which they remained for the next 340 years. This book traces the history of both burghs from earliest times to the present day. Through meticulous research which includes reference to the records and minutes of the two town councils, to local newspapers and even the deeds of old houses, it provides a fascinating insight into the histories of the two burghs and port. Anstruther: A History. Tour Anstruther, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Wemyss Parish Fife Scotland

Wemyss Parish, on the south shore of the county, derives its name from the Celtic word, Wamh, meaning caves, a number of which may be found in the rocks on the seashore. The parish is bounded by Markinch, Scoonie, Kennoway and Dysart. It measures about 6 miles by 1.5. The parish is in excellent cultivation, producing great quantities of potatoes and turnips. Ochre and ironstone are found, but the principal mineral is coal of which from 50000 to 60000 tons are produced annually. The manufactures of the parish consist mainly of ducks, dowlas, sheetings, huckabacks, diaper and canvas. There are 8 villages in the parish: West Wemyss, East Wemyss, Buckhaven, one of the largest fishing villages in Fife, Methil, with a fine harbour, Kirkland, with extensive spinning, weaving and bleaching works, Coaltown of Wemyss, East Newtown of Wemyss and Methilhill, the last three villages are all mining villages. The parish church is at East Wemyss, with a chapel of ease at West Wemyss. There is a Free Church at East Wemyss and a UP Church at Buckhaven. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Wemyss Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Tulliallan Parish Fife Scotland

Tulliallan parish contains the post-town of Kincardine and the village of Longannat. It is bounded by the parishes of Culross and Clackmannan. It measures about 2.75 miles north to south by 2.5 miles east to west. A considerable extent of valuable land has been reclaimed from the sweep of the tide by two extensive embankments. Sandstone of excellent quality, coal and ironstone abound. Excellent public communication by railway and river steamer are enjoyed at Kincardine. In addition to the parish church, there is a Free Church and a United Presbyterian church built in 1819. Edited from Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of Scotland published 1856. Tour Tulliallan Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Torryburn Parish Fife Scotland

Torryburn parish is bounded by the Firth of Forth, Perthshire, Saline, Carnock and Dunfermline. It measures about five miles by three miles. There are small piers at Crombie and Torryburn, but their importance is not so great as when they formed the port for Dunfermline. The village of Torryburn stands on the coast. A number of the inhabitants are weavers, producing damasks for Dunfermline and cotton goods for Glasgow. The parish church is at Torryburn, and there is a Free Church at Torry. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Torryburn Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Strathmiglo Parish Fife Scotland

Strathmiglo parish, containing the villages of Strathmiglo and Edenshead, or Gateside, is bounded by Auchtermuchty, Falkland, Arngask, Abernethy and Kinross-shire. It measures 7.5 miles by 4.5 miles. The River Eden divides the parish into two2 and drives four corn, one flour and one farina mill. The village of Strathmiglo was a Burgh of Barony but that status is now no more. The town house and a fine green remain. There are a parish church, a Free Church and a Reformed Presbyterian Church in the village of Strathmiglo, and a UP Church at Gateside. The inhabitants of the country districts are mostly employed in agriculture, but the villagers weave diapers and damask. Several manufacturers and agents reside in Strathmiglo and employ most of the hands. There are also a power-loom factory and bleachfield in Strathmiglo, at which a considerable number, mostly females, are employed. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Strathmiglo Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Scoonie Parish Fife Scotland

Scoonie parish, containing the baron burgh of Leven, is on the south coast of the county. It is bounded by Wemyss, Markinch, Kennoway, Kettle, Ceres and Largo. It is about five miles long by two miles broad. Beds of coal lie beneath the whole parish and are still worked at Kilmux. A bed of ochre occurs on the estates of Durie and Aithernie, and there are mills for grinding it in Leven. Leven burgh consists chiefly of 3 streets running parallel to each other, east and west, and connected by a number of bye-lanes. It is connected to Innerleven by a fine stone bridge. As with other towns on this shore, it is a favourite resort in the summer for sea bathing. A number of inhabitants are engaged in hand-loom weaving, but the greater number are employed in the mills in this and the neighbouring parishes. There are flax spinning mills, saw mills, a flour mill, a bone mill, a lintseed oil mill, a herring net factory, an iron foundry and a brickworks. There is a parish church, a Free Church and a UP Church. There was formerly an independent chapel, but it has been shut for some time. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Scoonie Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Saline Parish Fife Scotland

Saline parish is on the western boundary of the county. It is bordered by Clackmannanshire, Culross, Torryburn, Kinross-shire, Dunfermline and Carnock. It is about 5.5 miles from east to west, by about 5 miles north to south. The district is chiefly pastoral, although there are some marshy areas and some good arable areas. Coal, limestone and ironstone abound. The chief employments are connected with coal and ironstone mining, and agriculture. The only work of a manufacturing nature is a rather extensive agricultural implement manufactory conducted by Barrowman & Co. There is both a parish church and a Free church. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Saline Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

St Monans Parish Fife Scotland

The parish of St Monans stands on the shores of the Firth of Forth. It is bounded by Pittenweem, Elie, Kilconquhar and Carnbee. The parish extends about one mile along the coast and about 1.5 miles from north to south. The fishing village of St Monans, where the majority of the parishoners live, is situated nearly halfway between Elie and Pittenweem. It is a Burgh of Barony, governed by its baron Bailies and Council. There is a Sea Box Society connected with the village; Savings Banks and other social and benevolent institutions. The villagers catch great quantities of herring, cod, ling, haddock, etc. The inhabitants of the landward parts are chiefly employed in agriculture. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour St Monans Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

St Andrews and St Leonards Parish Fife Scotland

The parishes lie on the south bank of the River Eden and are bounded by Leuchars, Kingsbarns, Denino, Cameron, Ceres and Kemback. From the Eden to the city of St Andrews the coast presents a flat, firm, sandy beach so famous in the annals of golfing. On Strathkinness moor and on Nydie Hill, both at the west of the parish, are quarries of excellent freestone, of which most of the houses in St Andrews are built. The city contains 3 principal streets, all intersected by smaller ones, all well paved and lit by gas. The weaving of linen is carried on to a considerable extent for establishments in Newburgh and Dundee. The making of golf balls was long a great branch of industry but is now extinct. A spinning mill was tried, but did not succeed. There is now an extensive steam sawmill near the harbour. Flour mills on a large scale are worked by the Incorporation of Bakers. Edited from Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of Scotland published 1856. Tour St Andrews and St Leonards Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Pittenweem Parish Fife Scotland

Pittenweem parish, consisting of the Royal Burgh, lies on the Firth of Forth and is bounded by St Monans and Anstruther Wester. It is only 1.5 miles long by 0.5 miles broad. An abundance of excellent coal exists in the parish, it was once worked, but now only requires capital and enterprise to re-commence this valuable activity. The Royal Burgh consists of several streets, with many of the houses looking substantial and neat. The harbour has a south-westerly entrance and has been much improved of late. A number of sloops and schooners belong to the harbour and the shore dues amount to upwards of £200 per annum. Much business is done in the export of potatoes and grain. The principal imports are coal, wood and salt - the latter for fish curing purposes. Pittenweem is an extensive fish curing station. The number of crans brought into the harbour in 1860 being 14730, the value of which amounted to £13000. The majority of the Population are employed in connection with the sea, such as sailors, fishermen, fish curers, coopers, etc. There is, in addition to the parish church, an Episcopalian Church, a UP Church and a Free Church preaching station. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Pittenweem Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Newburn Parish Fife Scotland

Newburn parish is bounded on the north and east by Kilconquhar, on the south by Largo Bay and on the west by Largo. It is 3.5 miles from north to south and two miles in breadth. Its area is 2400 acres, all under cultivation except 350 under pasture and 130 under wood. The land surface near the shore is sandy, forming extensive links which are kept in pasture. The land ascends from the shore to the northwards, reaching its greatest height at Gilston. The soil, with the exception of the links, is very fertile. The rent of land averages £2-12-0 per acre. The parish schoolmaster's salary is £30, plus £14 of fees, besides which there is an allowance for teaching a certain number of Poor children, from a fund left by John Wood of Orkie in 1659. There is one public house in the parish; sobriety and industry prevail. The nearest market towns are Colinsburgh and Largo. Balchristie is the only hamlet in the parish, containing a few houses. From A Descriptive and historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross and Clackmannan, M Barbieri, published in 1857. Tour Newburn Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Newburgh Parish Fife Scotland

Newburgh parish forms the boundary of the county at its northwest corner. It is bounded by the River Tay, Abdie, Abernethy, Auchtermuchty and Collessie. The parish enjoys good seaward communication through the port of Newburgh, is traversed by the turnpike road from Cupar to Perth, and has a station on the Perth fork of the E P & D Railway. The main part of the Royal Burgh consists of one long street, a range of houses fronting the harbour, and a number of lanes leading down to the shore. A modern suburb on the south, Mount Pleasant, is in Abdie parish. Both the shops and the principal dwelling houses indicate considerable taste and prosperity on the part of the owners. Its situation on the Tay is exceedingly pleasant. The town house, with spire, was erected in 1808. The linen trade is the chief employer in the town. A considerable trade in grain is carried on, with a weekly fair for corn. The harbour consists of a long pier parallel to the river with 4 jetties at right angles to it. There are 20 vessels belonging to the port, of the aggregate burden of 1256 tons; and one packet is regularly engaged in conveying raw material and manufactured produce between the town and Dundee. The principal exports are lime, grain and potatoes; while coal, timber and other miscellaneous goods form the imports. There is a parish church in the burgh, and also 2 UP Churches. There is a Free Church for Newburgh and Abdie but it is situated in Abdie parish. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Newburgh Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Moonzie Parish Fife Scotland

Moonzie parish is bounded on the north by Kilmany and Creich; on the south by Monimail; on the east by Cupar and Kilmany; and on the west by Creich. Length from north to south is two miles by one and a half miles in breadth. Area 1375 acres; the whole is arable with the exception of 1.5 acres under wood and 30 acres of moss-land. The surface is finely diversified by various round-shaped hills of no great eminence, presenting in other places, particularly where it marches with Kilmany, level flats of considerable extent. Besides smaller streams, it is watered by Moonzie Burn, that rises from Lordscairnie Myre, runs east through several parishes, and falls into the Eden, near the Inner Bridge. Till within the last 60 years there was a lake or myre in the farm of Lordscairnie but by an expensive drainage it has been converted into arable ground. This parish is the most remarkable in the county for its deficiency of trees, and, till lately, the total absence of hedges. The soil is generally a strong black loam, or a light dry loam, resting on rotten whinstone. The rent of the land may be averaged at £2-10s per acre. If this parish be not picturesque, it is one of the best agricultural ones in the county; the Fifeshire black horned cattle is preferred; much attention is bestowed on rearing good horses; there are 4 thrashing mills. Coal has to be brought from Balbirnie or Dysart; or English coal from Newburgh or Balmerino. Whinstone is found, but neither freestone nor limestone. Parish church and parish school. There has been no public house in the parish for many years. There is neither village nor hamlet in the parish; though several small collections of houses form the residences of the agricultural labourers belonging to the different farms. The parish church situated on rising ground in the south west of the parish is 3 miles distant from Cupar, which is the nearest market town and post town. Fom A Descriptive and historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross and Clackmannan, M Barbieri, published in 1857. Tour Moonzie Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Markinch Parish Fife Scotland

Markinch parish is bounded by Kennoway, Wemyss, Dysart, Kinglassie, Leslie, Falkland and Kettle. It measures about six miles north to south by four miles broad. A small detached portion containing the village of Innerleven, or Dubbieside, lies at the mouth of the Leven and is cut off from the rest of the parish by that of Wemyss. The parish contains the villages of Markinch, Milton, Coaltown, Balcurvie, Windygates, Thornton, Woodside, Balbirnie Bridge and Kirkforthar Feus. Coal has been extensively worked, but the deposits at Balbirnie are becoming exhausted. There are paper mills at Balbirnie Bridge, Rothes and Auchmuty; flax and tow mills at Milton, Haugh Mill, Thornton and Sythrum; bleachfields at Rothes, Balgonie, Lochtyside and Kirkforthar Feus; a woollen manufactory at Balbirne Bridge and a power loom linen factory at Milton. There are also a number of flour, corn and saw mills in the parish; and a large distillery and malting establishment at Cameron Bridge. The parish church is at Markinch; there are chapels of ease at Thornton and Milton; a UP Church and a Free Church at Markinch; and a UP church at Innerleven. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Markinch Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Logie Parish Fife Scotland

Logie parish was anciently called Logie Murdoch. It is bounded on the north and west by Kilmany, on the south by Dairsie and Leuchars, and on the east by Leuchars and Forgan. It is 4 miles in length by 1.25 miles in breadth. It is watered by several burns from the higher grounds. Any good fertile loam is to be found on the sides of the hills; the lower part being generally moorish and thin. The average rent of land may be set down at £2 per acre. This being an agricultural parish, every means has been used to improve it; and were the enclosures better than they are, farmers would rear more sheep than they do, as they are found greatly to improve light dry land; that is, by allowing the land to lie in grass for some years. The sheep are of various breeds. A good deal of cattle are reared here, but more are bought and fattened in winter by turnips for the butcher. The Fife breed answers best. The quaintity of grain grown is in the following order: oats, barley and wheat; then grass, turnip, potatoes, pease and beans, occupy most ground in the order just given. Coal and freestone are not wrought in the parish, but whinstone is very abundant, from being so near the hills. Lucklawhill consists of a yellow coloured porphyry, "very hard, and susceptible of a very fine polish". Parish church and Free church, but no U.P. church. Parish school, but no private school. A library was left by Walter Bowman for the use of the parish about a hundred years ago. There is no public house in the parish. Logie village is a small one, near the parish church, from which the nearest market and post town is Cupar, distant 4.5 miles. There are two other hamlets. Edited from A Descriptive and historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross and Clackmannan, M Barbieri, published in 1857. Tour Logie Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Leuchars Parish Fife Scotland

Leuchars parish is nine miles in length by five miles in breadth. It is bounded on the east by the German Ocean, and watered by the Eden on the south and south-west. The surface is level and the soil tolerably fertile. There is an extensive distillery in the parish. The village of Leuchars is pleasantly situated about a mile from the coast, and 6 from St Andrews, on the road from that town to Dundee. The majority of the inhabitants are employed in the linen manufacture. The Edinburgh & Dundee Railway passes through the parish, and there is a station in the village. The church is very ancient, and considered one of the most perfect specimens of Saxon architecture in Scotland; it is supposed to have been erected in the 12th century. There is also a free church in the parish. From Slater's Directory published 1852. Tour Leuchars Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Monimail Parish Fife Scotland

Monimail parish occupies a portion of the central valley of Fifeshire. It is bounded on the north by Cupar, Moonzie, Creich and Dunbog; on the south by Collessie and Cults; on the east by Cupar and on the west by Abdie and Collessie. It is five miles long by four miles in breadth. A range of whinstone hills lies to the north, of which Mount Hill is the highest; on top of which a beautiful pillar has been erected in memory of the late Lord Hopetoun in 1826; it is upwards of 100 feet in height. The south portion is generally more level, and diversified by soft undulations. The parish is watered by several rivulets, one of them turning a mill-wheel without a dam; they all fall into the river Eden. The Fife breed of cattle, and the Ayrshire cows for milk, are preferred. Though sheep are not reared, they are largely bought to feed on turnips through the winter. Potatoes are rather extensively cultivated for the London market, as also for feeding cattle. The rent of the land will run from £1-5s to £3-10s per acre. Coal has to be brought from Markinch or Dysart. The south half contains freestone, sufficient for local use. The whinstone, though abundant, is with few exceptions unfit for building, as it soon yields to the action of the atmosphere. Weaving of linens is carried on in the parish to the annual value of 'between £2000 and £3000'. Parish church and Free church. Parish school and three private schools. There are 3 public houses in the parish. There are 2 parish libraries; and a flourishing friendly society. There is one village, Letham, with 450 inhabitants; it is 4 miles west of Cupar and 5 miles east of Auchtermuchty; it has an annual fair in June. There are 2 hamlets in the parish: Monimail with 85 inhabitants and Easter Fernie with 60. From A Descriptive & historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross & Clackmannan, M Barbieri, published in 1857. Tour Monimail Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Leslie Parish Fife Scotland

Leslie parish, containing the burgh of barony of Leslie and the village of Prinlaws, lies at the base of the Lomond Hills, between them and the River Leven. It is bounded by Markinch, Falkland and Kinross-shire and measures about four miles by three miles. Coal and limestone occur, but are not worked. Prinlaws, immediately to the west of Leslie burgh, contains extensive flax spinning, power-loom weaving and bleaching establishments, partly driven by water and partly by steam power. These are the most extensive works of their kind in the county. The burgh of Leslie has records dating back 300 years, but they do not contain anything remarkable. The town has doubled in size in the last 50 years, due to the prosperity of its manufactures of linens and woollens, flax spinning, paper making, yarn bleaching, etc. The parish church was built in 1820; there are also 2 UP Churches and a Free Church. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Leslie Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Largo Parish Fife Scotland

Largo parish is bounded by the parishes of Kilconquhar, Newburn, Ceres and Scoonie. It contains the villages of Upper Largo, or Kirkton, Lower Largo, Lundin Mill and New Gilston. It is about 4.5 miles north, south and 3 miles in breadth. To the west of Largo Law, a deeply wooded ravine, Keil’s Den, intersects the parish from north to south. It is laid out with footpaths and is very picturesque, so is a favourite resort for all those who visit in the summer for sea bathing. The village of Lower Largo stands on the bay. Most of the houses have a decaying look, being mostly built from red sandstone taken from the sea. In old times a large trade was carried on here with Holland, and more recently Norway, but that is long at an end. Upper Largo is a well-built village with a number of good houses and shops. There is an institution in the village called Wood’s Hospital, for the maintenance of indigent persons of the name of Wood. Both Upper and Lower Largo are favourite resorts for sea bathing. The village of Lundin Mill is chiefly inhabited by weavers. The village of New Gilston is chiefly inhabited by miners. A noted native of the parish was Alexander Selkirk, the prototype of Robinson Crusoe. Besides the parish church, there is a Free Church at Kirkton, and a UP Church and a Baptist Church at Lower Largo. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Largo Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kirkcaldy Parish Fife Scotland

Kirkcaldy is a royal burgh and a populous thriving seaport. From the narrow dimensions on which the town stands, the inhabitants have had to build their houses in a continuous line along the shore giving rise to the name, the lang toun of Kirkcaldy. The number of vessels belonging to the port at present is 74 with an aggregate burthen of 9956 tons. The principal imports are flax and grain. Vessels from here have been employed in the Davis Strait whale fishery for many years, and 2 vessels are at present so engaged. The trade of Kirkcaldy is similar to that of Dundee - spinning flax and weaving coarse linen goods. There is also a large floorcloth manufactory, brewing, ironfounding, machine making, and a considerable corn and meal trade. As well as the parish church, there are a free church and chapels for united presbyterians, baptists and independents. Edited from Slater's Directory published 1852. Tour Kirkcaldy Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kingsbarns Parish Fife Scotland

The parish of Kingsbarns lies in the eastern part of the county, with its eastern side to the German Ocean. Originally it formed part of Crail, but was separated from that parish in 1631. The village lies on the public road round the coast, 6.5 miles south-east from St Andrews, and 3.5 miles north from Crail. It is a thriving little place, and carries on a considerable manufacture of linens for the Dundee market. The largest and best flag-stones in the country are obtained near the village, and marble of a fine quality is met with occasionally. A little to the east of the harbour are the fragments of a castle or palace, once the residence of David I, the remains of which consist chiefly of a wall, now partially enclosing a garden. Pitmilly, a very ancient seat, stands in the northern part of the parish. Fairs are held on the first Tuesday in June, and the third Wednesday in October. From Slater's Directory published 1852. Tour Kingsbarns Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kinglassie Parish Fife Scotland

The parish of Kinglassie extends four miles length, by two miles in breadth at its narrowest part and four miles at its broadest. It is watered by the Lochty and the Ore, tributary streams of the Leven. On the first of these stands the irregular village of Kinglassie, which is two miles from Leslie, and 3.5 north-east from Lochgelly. There are quarries of freestone, and the coal obtained in this parish is considered the best in the county. The inhabitants of the village are principally supported by weaving. The places of worship are an established and a free church. A fair is entitled to be held on the third Wednesday in May. From Slater's Directory, published 1852. Tour Kinglassie Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kinghorn Parish Fife Scotland

Kinghorn parish extends along the coast of the Firth of Forth for four miles. It is bounded by Burntisland, Aberdour, Abbotshall and Auchtertool. It contains the Royal Burgh of Kinghorn, the village of Invertiel, now a suburb of Kirkcaldy, the harbour of Pettycur and the island of Inchkeith. To the north-west of the town is Kinghorn Loch, which extends to about twenty acres. It is well stocked with pike. A combination Poor’s House for the parishes of Burntisland, Kinghorn, Kirkcaldy and Abbotshall, stands on the shore a little to the east of Kinghorn burgh. There are 2 spinning mills and a bleachfield at Tyrie at which great numbers of the inhabitants are employed. There is also a brewery, a large corn and flour mill and an extensive glue manufactory in the town. There is an apology for a harbour which is of little use except for fishing boats; however the harbour at Pettycur affords good accommodation for vessels and was the regular ferry station from Fife to Newhaven and Leith before the opening of the E P& D Railway and the transference of the ferry station to Burntisland. In addition to the parish church, there is a Free Church and a UP Church in Kinghorn, and a chapel of ease at Invertiel. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife & Kinross published 1862. Tour Kinghorn Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kilrenny Parish Fife Scotland

Kilrenny parish, consisting of the inland burgh of Kilrenny and the fishing village of Cellardyke, extends along the Firth of Forth for 3.5 miles and inland for two miles. It is bounded by Crail, Carnbee and the 2 Anstruthers. Upper Kilrenny contains the parish church, while Nether Kilrenny, or Cellardyke, consist of one main street running along the shore as a continuation of Anstruther Wester and Easter. It is one of the most important fishing stations in the county. The Anstruther Free and UP Churches are both within this parish. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife & Kinross published 1862. Tour Kilrenny Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kilmany Parish Fife Scotland

Kilmany Parish is bounded on the north by Forgan and Balmerino, on the south by Cupar and Logie, on the east by Forgan and on the west by Creich and Moonzie. The Eden river separates it from Leuchars. It is six miles from east to west and two miles north to south. Its area is 4700 acres; 3550 Scotch acres are under cultivation and 250 are under wood. The west part of the parish consists of softly swelling hills and pleasant valleys. The parish is divided at different places by small ridges, the highest not exceeding 400 feet above sea level. The soil varies but generally is very fertile. Rent of land averages £2-5-0 per acre. Within the last 75 years more than 200 acres of morass have been drained. A good deal of cattle of the Fife breed are raised and sold fat; a great number of sheep are annually fed on turnips for the butcher. There are seventeen thrashing mills, besides 3 corn mills and 1 saw mill. There is no coal in the parish, it being brought from Ceres or Cameron. Apart from the sawmill and about a dozen of weavers, there is no industry in the parish. The parish school is at Rathillet, with 2 female schools, one at Hazleton and one at Kilmany.There are 2 public houses. There is no village but 2 hamlets, Kilmany, half way between Cupar and Newport, where the parish church is situated; and Rathillet which is a mile to the west. The late celebrated Dr Chalmers was minister of Kilmany from 1803 to 1815. Edited from A Descriptive & historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross and Clackmannan, M Barbieri, published in 1857. Tour Kilmany Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kilconquhar Parish Fife Scotland

Kilconquhar parish is bounded by Elie, Cameron, Ceres, St Monans, Carnbee, Newburn, Largo and the River Forth. It is nine miles from north to south and two miles in breadth. There are 2900 acres under cultivation, 1600 under pasture, 800 under wood and about 200 acres of links. Kilconquhar Loch, nearly 2 miles in circumference, boasts some of the largest eel and pike in the country. It is also frequented by a large quantity of duck, teal and swans. There are 1450 cattle and over 500 horses, the latter being reared for the market and sold at 4 years old. There are 24 thrashing mills. Coal is abundant in the parish. Nearly 300 persons are employed weaving dowlasses, checks and sheetings for the Kirkland, Kirkcaldy and Dundee markets; yet there are no spinning mills nor manufactures in the parish. Besides the Church at Kilconquhar, there is a chapel of ease at Largoward, and UP churches at Kilconquhar and Colinsburgh. There is a parish school and 6 others. There are 12 public houses. Earlsferry village and royal burgh consists of a single street with bye lanes, intimately joined with Elie. The inhabitants are weavers, fishers and colliers. Colinsburgh is a burgh of barony under the Balcarres family. Its main industry is leather currying. Kilconquhar village also has a tan-works. From A Descriptive & historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross and Clackmannan, M Barbieri, published 1857. Tour Kilconquhar Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kettle Parish Fife Scotland

Kettle parish lies partly in the Howe of Fife and partly on the hills to the south. It is bounded by Falkland, Markinch, Kennoway, Scoonie, Ceres, Cults and Collessie. It is about eight miles north-west to south-east by about three miles broad at its widest. It contains the villages of King’s Kettle, Kettle Bridge, Coaltown of Burnturk, Balmalcolm and Muirhead. For many years the parish was one of the main seats of linen manufacture in Fife, but its importance is declining. Agriculture employs the next biggest number, followed by the coal works at Burnturk and the lime works at Forthar. The present parish church was built in 1832. There is also a UP Church in King’s Kettle and a Free Church at Balmalcolm serving the parishes of Kettle and Cults. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Kettle Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kennoway Parish Fife Scotland

Kennoway parish is bounded by Kettle, Scoonie, Wemyss and Markinch. It contains the villages of Kennoway, Baintown, Bonnybank and Star. It is about three and half miles east to west and two miles north to south. There are 2 corn and barley mills, and a sawmill. Coal is worked, though only of middling quality. The chief occupations are connected with agriculture and the linen industry, but the number of hand loom weavers is declining considerably. There are three churches: the parish church, a Free Church and a UP Church, the oldest building. There is a parish school and also a female industrial school in Kennoway, and a subscription school in Star. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Kennoway Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Kemback Parish Fife Scotland

The parish of Kemback is nearly of triangular figure, with its broadest side to the Eden, and measures about three and a half miles in breadth and length. It is one of the richest and most beautiful districts in the country; out of 1850 acres more than 1500 are fine arable land, and there are many fine plantations in different parts of the parish. Besides the Eden it is watered by the Ceres stream. The church stands about a mile and a half from Ceres village and three from Cupar. From Slater's Directory, published in 1852. Tour Kemback Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Inverkeithing Parish Fife Scotland

Inverkeithing parish is bounded by Dalgety and Dunfermline and sits on the shore of the Firth of Forth. The parish consists of two main parts: one extending north for four miles and one mile broad; and one stretching along the shore for nearly four miles. Various kinds of stone abound, including limestone which is extensively wrought. Besides the Royal Burgh of Inverkeithing, the only other village is Hillend. The Royal Burgh consists of one principal street with numerous lanes branching off it. A considerable number of the houses have an old antiquated appearance, others have been much improved and modernised in the past forty years. The parish church and a UP Church are both situated on the main street. The town contains a corn exchange, a music hall, a town house and jail. Industry includes a foundry, an iron shipbuilding establishment, fire brick and gas retort works, a distillery, a tan work, a rope and sail manufactory and a shipbuilding yard with a patent slip which affords great facilities for repairing vessels. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Inverkeithing Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Sunday, 26 August 2007

Forgan Parish Fife Scotland

Forgan parish extends two miles in length by two miles in breadth, lying near the mouth of the Tay; having Ferryport-on-Craig on the east, Leuchars and Kilmany on the south and Balmerino on the west. The land generally declines to the Tay from an elevated background, and is now well cultivated, inclosed and beautifully wooded. On the shore is Newport where there is a small harbour and ferry station opposite to Dundee. Recently some handsome villas have been erected on the slopes to the river, and a new road cut to Ferryport-on-Craig. Forgan has a constant communication maintained with the Dundee side by ferry. The Kirk of Forgan, which is situate inland, is about 10 miles from Cupar and the like distance from St Andrews. About one mile west from Newport is the small harbour of Woodhaven. From Slater's Directory, published 1852. Tour Forgan Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Flisk Parish Fife Scotland

Flisk parish is bounded on the north by the Tay, on the south by Creich and Abdie, on the east by Balmerino and on the west by Dunbog. It is 4 miles in length from east to west and one mile in breadth. Area 3.5 square miles; under cultivation 2210 acres; under pasture 140 acres; under wood 266 acres. Occupying the northern slope of the Ochils, a considrable portion of its surface is hilly and irregular, except about mile from the river, where it is level ground along the whole extent of the parish: the hills are Lyndemus, nearly 750 feet above sea level, Logie Law and Glenduckie Hill. With the exception of the Tay, the parish is watered by small burns and supplied by innumerable springs of the finest water. The soil for the most part is a clayey loam, varying from 1 to 3 feet in depth, lying on rock, clay and till; the whole is nevertheless fertile, and the land is found cultivated from the shore of the Tay to the summit opf the hills. Rent of arable is at an average £1-10s. per acre. Much has been done by draining land naturally wet; till lately stone draining was chiefly used, but now tile-draining is introduced; some of the grounds are not sufficiently enclosed; a mixture of 1 part of bone-dust to 2 parts of coal ashes is much used for turnips on the hill lands; wheat, barley, and oats, with potatoes, turnips, peas and beans are grown in the proportion of the order given here; the Fifeshire breed of cattle crossed with the Forfarshire is the kind kept; there are few sheep kept, owing to the hardness of the soil not being favourable to grass; there are eight thrashing mills; there is a great deficiency of cottages in this parish, which is the cause of the continued decrease of Population. There are 3 heritors. Coals have to be brought from Newburgh or Balmerino or the Balbirnie pit; though some use English coal, brought in vessels to the beach. There are 3 quarries of sandstone and clinkstone; none of them of importance, and only used for local purposes. The parish being entirely a rural one, there are no manufactures carried on within it. The patron is the Earl of Zetland. There is no Dissenting place of worship. Parish school only. There are no fairs nor public houses in the parish. The nearest market towns are Newburgh 6 miles, Cupar 8 miles and Dundee 10 miles. There is a post office at Newburgh, but the post town is Cupar. There is no village, but a small hamlet, the farm of Glenduckie, consisting of a dozen cottages. From A Descriptive and historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross and Clackmannan, M Barbieri, published in 1857. Tour Flisk Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Ferryport-on-Craig Parish Fife Scotland

Ferryport-on-Craig parish, or South Ferry, is 5 miles in length by from half a mile to 1 mile in breadth, stretching along the sea at the mouth of the Tay, where the land rises into a hilly range, extending westwards. The village is 3 miles from Dundee, seated at the base of the hills opposite to Broughty Ferry. The Edinburgh and Dundee railway terminates here, and passengers are forwarded by steam-boat to Dundee and Broughty Ferry, both on the north bank of the River Tay. For facilitating the shipping of goods, the railway company have constructed a dock and thrown out a pier; the latter can be approached by the steamers at all states of the tide. A great part of the village is composed of new houses, some of which are suited to the accommodation of visitors, who resort hither from the inland parts of the country for the benefit of sea-bathing, the beach here being naturally well-formed for the purpose: but the chief support of the inhabitants is derived from the weaving of course linens, and from the salmon fishery, which is coextensive with the parish along the coast; the fish captured here are mostly sent to the London market. The Glasgow and Edinburgh Bank have opened a bank here. The places of worship are the parish church, a free church, and baptist and presbyterian chapels. From Slater's Directory published 1852. Tour Ferryport-on-Craig Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Falkland Parish Fife Scotland

Falkland parish contains the Royal Burgh of Falkland and the villages of Newton of Falkland and Freuchie. It is bounded by Kinross-shire, Strathmiglo, Auchtermuchty, Kettle, Markinch and Leslie. It measures about 6 miles by 4 miles. There is a considerable tract of flat land between the northern boundary of the parish and the burgh and this was once part of the royal chase. Nothing now remains of the ancient forest of Falkland in which our Kings enjoyed the pleasures of the chase, except for a small portion of natural wood at Drumdreel in the parish of Strathmiglo. The forest was destroyed by Cromwell who cut down the timber to take to Dundee for the construction of a fort there. The town of Falkland consists of one main street with some cross lanes. It was at one time regularly afflicted with malaria from the neighbouring marshes, but drainage has resulted in a remarkably healthy town. The chief object of attraction is the Royal Palace, favourite home of James VI. In addition to the parish church, there are both an Independent Chapel and a Free Church in Falkland, and a UP Church in Freuchie. Edited from Westwood's Directory for the counties of Fife and Kinross published 1862. Tour Falkland Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Elie Parish Fife Scotland

Elie parish is situated on the Firth of Forth around Elie Bay. It is bounded on the north and west by Kilconquhar and on the east by Abercrombie. It is 1 mile from east to west and 1 mile in breadth, with an area of 1590 acres. 1470 acres are under cultivation, 70 acres are wooded, and 40 acres are waste land lying near the shore, being little better than a bed of sand. There are no hills. It is watered by a small stream which issues from Kilconquhar Loch and empties into Elie harbour. The soil is of an average quality. The rent of land is from £1 to £4-5/- per acre. Although coals are not wrought now in the parish, it bears ample proof of this having been done at a former period. Coals are now brought from another parish or imported from Newcastle. There is a Free Church but no U P church. There are 2 small schools besides a parish school. With few exceptions the inhabitants are sober, industrious, moral and religious. Elie Burgh is a Burgh of Barony. It is neat, clean, well-built and has a fine appearance. The harbour is good, safe and well sheltered from W and SW gales. A few fishermen live in the village, and go along the coast for white fish. Grain, potatoes and other produce are taken to Leith weekly; and other mercantile goods are brought back in return. The Aberdeen and Dundee steamboats stop at the harbour twice a week to land and take in passengers. The nearest market is Colinsburgh, 2.5 miles distant, which is also the post town, although there is a sub-post office in the village. The parish church and school are here. There is one inn, a good subscription library and a friendly society called the Sea Box. From the fine clean sands few places in the Firth are better adapted for sea bathing, hence in summer it is much resorted to for that purpose. It is 5 miles from Anstruther, 13 from St Andrews and 15 from Cupar. Fom A Descriptive and historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross and Clackmannan, M Barbieri, published 1857. Tour Elie Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Dysart Parish Fife Scotland

Dysart parish, on the Firth of Forth, is 4 miles in length from north to south and 2 miles in breadth. It is bounded by Kinglassie, Markinch, Wemyss, Auchterderran and Kirkcaldy. Much waste land has been reclaimed in the past 60 years by draining, embanking and fencing. The main crops are wheat, barley, oats, potatoes, hay and turnip. The Fife breed of cattle are reared, as well as horses, but few sheep. Coals are abundant and cheap; although they are slow to kindle and leave much ash, they produce a strong heat. There are also some limestone and ironstone quarries. A ton of ironstone produces nearly 12 cwt. of iron. Dysart was a very prosperous port before the Union [1707], but all its prosperity has since left it. Linen manufacture remained, with 2088 looms in 1836. There is also now a flax spinning mill, a pottery, a rope-works and other useful trades. Besides the church in Dysart, there is a chapel of ease in Pathhead, a Free Church and a UP Church. Besides the parish school there are 14 other schools in the parish. Although there are nearly 150 public houses, sobriety, industry and morality are as fully conspicuous here as anywhere else. Low wages no doubt accounts for the sobriety. Besides the burgh of Dysart, there are also the villages of Pathhead, Sinclairton and Gallowtown and the hamlets of Hackleymoor and the Borland. From A Descriptive and historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross and Clackmannan, M Barbieri, published 1857. Tour Dysart Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Dunino Parish Fife Scotland

The parish of Dunino is bounded on the north by Cameron and St Andrews, on the east by St Andrews and Kingsbarns, on the south by Kingsbarns and Crail and on the west by Carnbee and Cameron. The lands of Kingsmuir belong to this parish although claimed by Crail. The parish is 3 miles from east to west and 2.5 miles in breadth. With an area of 3315 acres, 2955 are under cultivation, 300 are wooded and 60 are waste land. The highest elevation, Dunino Law from which the parish probably derives its name, is about 300 feet above sea level. It is watered by 3 rivulets that unite into the Kenly or Pitmilly Burn, which empties itself into the German Ocean. Till lately the soil was wet and moorish, especially King's Muir - which is rather a stiff clay; while other parts are sandy or alluvial. Much has been done this century by draining, planting and enclosing, and reclaiming waste land. There are 12 thrashing mills and 1 corn mill. Land valued at £2600 in 1797 is now worth nearly £12000. Bogs have been converted into corn land. Formerly little wheat was raised, now it surpasses oats and barley. The cattle are of the Fifeshire breed. There are about 200 sheep in the parish. There are 4 heritors. The whole parish presents vestiges of coal workings at a former period although none is worked now, it being brought from St Andrews, Anstruther or any other neighbouring parish. Limestone exists for local use. Much fine marble exists, which when polished has a beautiful yellow and white striated appearance. The freestone is durable and fine in texture. Ironstone has been found. The parish is wholly agricultural. The patron is the United College, St Andrews. The stipend is £202-6-6, with a glebe of £28. There are 2 public houses in the parish. Though the post town is St Andrews, there are 6 post offices within from 3 to 7 miles. There is no village and the nearest market town is St Andrews, 4 miles distant. East Anstruther is 5 miles distant and Cupar 13. The inhabitants are intelligent, sober and industrious, and certainly more moral than they had been in 1650 (when the weavers were sometimes cited before the Kirk Session for carrying home their webs on Sundays, millers were grinding their corn and reapers were cutting down corn on the holy day). The present church was erected in 1826, and there is no dissenting church in the parish. From A Descriptive and historic gazeteer of the counties of Fife, Kinross and Clackmannan, M Barberi, published 1857. Tour Dunino Parish, Fife, Scotland, on an Ancestry Tour of Scotland. Best Scottish Tours, Best Scottish Food, Best Scottish Hotels, Small Group Tours of Scotland.

Culross Fife Scotland Map


Culross, Fife, Scotland Map. Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and Glenrothes South (OS Explorer Map).

Methil Fife Scotland Map


Methil, Fife, Scotland Map. Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and Glenrothes South (OS Explorer Map).

Kirkcaldy Graveyards Fife Scotland


Kirkcaldy Graveyards, Fife, Scotland. Guide to Kirkcaldy's Graveyards.

History Of Cupar Fife Scotland


History Of Cupar, Fife, Scotland. Cupar was created a royal burgh in 1328, though its name is Pictish, suggesting that there had been an important settlement there since the 7th or 8th century if not earlier. Until the 16th century it was among the richest royal burghs in Scotland, but declined in the 17th century, its trade handicapped by its distance from the sea. It flourished once again as a centre of the linen industry in the 18th century. As the county town of Fife, and a town which serviced travellers on their way from Edinburgh to Dundee and Aberdeen, Cupar became a 'leisure town', attracting well-off retired people and country gentry to its balls, horse races, theatre and library, as well as the services offered by banks, lawyers and doctors, and brothels. But by the mid 19th century the railway carried travellers through without stopping, industrial development shifted to west Fife where coal was plentiful, and St Andrews took over as the cultural centre of east Fife. Because the town did not develop major industries, it retains its medieval town plan and many fine buildings from its Georgian heyday. Cupar: A History.

Street Map of Cowdenbeath Fife Scotland


Street Map of Cowdenbeath, Fife, Scotland. Full Colour Street Map of Dunfermline, Rosyth, Inverkeithing, Cowdenbeath: 014.

Street Map of Inverkeithing Fife Scotland


Street Map of Inverkeithing, Fife, Scotland. Full Colour Street Map of Dunfermline, Rosyth, Inverkeithing, Cowdenbeath: 014.